Which districts voted against the HST?

Stephen Gordon laments British Columbians’ failure to ratify the HST, which will reduce our standard of living in B.C. for many years.The case in favour of the HST was overwhelming and no expert opposed the HST in public. Which people voted against their own best interests?

The Globe and Mail’s Chris Hannay presents some graphs showing proportion voting for the HST against certain demographic characteristics at the electoral district level. Districts with higher incomes tended to vote to keep the HST:


and a similar pattern holds for education: unconditionally, districts with more educated people were more likely to vote to keep the HST. Hannay implies that these effects are really the same effect: more educated people also tend to earn more, so the education—vote correlation is just another way of seeing that higher income people voted in their class interest.

An alternate explanation draws on my post from a couple of days ago on education and beliefs that economists understand the effects of taxation on the economy: uneducated people tend to place low weight on expert analysis, certainly including economic analysis. The direct impact of the HST on prices was easy for everyone to observe—they’re printed on cash register receipts. But the indirect effects, the effects on changes in embedded prices, were hard to observe. The HST was not in place long enough to observe effects on investment and growth. One had to yield to expert opinion to draw the correct conclusion that the HST is good policy.

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